Saturday, June 23, 2012

My Mezamashii Experience

From time to time, I receive information on a unique running project or experience and want to make sure I share. The Mezamashii Run Project is an effort by Mizuno to help create a more euphoric or unique running experience — a more "brilliant" run — for more runners everywhere. My such experience was running my first marathon--Check out my story:

My Mezamashii Run 

The word "mezamashii" means "eye-opening" or "brilliant" in Japanese — it’s a word that captures the euphoric feeling of a brilliant run.  Check out the project and your might be interested.  My wife swears by Mizuno's!  Just go to Mezamashii Run Project and click on "Apply for an Invite."

The Mezamashii Run Project is an effort by Mizuno to help create a more euphoric running experience — a more "brilliant" run — for more runners everywhere. The word "mezamashii" means "eye-opening" or "brilliant" in Japanese — it's a word that captures the euphoric feeling of a brilliant run.
The Mezamashii community will continue to receive brilliant run inspiration from Mizuno in the form of early access to product launches and other exclusive Mizuno events. Over the course of the remainder of the year, Mizuno will give away thousands of shoes to runners who are looking to experience more euphoric, brilliant, mezamashii running.


About Mizuno USA

Mizuno USA, Inc.'s roots stem from its parent company Mizuno Corporation. Mizuno Corporation was established in Osaka, Japan in 1906 by Rihachi Mizuno. Today, Mizuno USA is located in Norcross, GA and continues to manufacture and distribute high quality golf, baseball, softball, running, track & field and volleyball equipment, apparel, and footwear. Mizuno USA, Inc., is a wholly owned subsidiary of Mizuno Corporation, one of the largest specialty sporting goods manufacturers in the world.
Since their founding, Mizuno has taken special pride and pleasure in being able to participate in the exciting world of sports and providing sports equipment of the highest quality. Each and every one of Mizuno is guided by the ideal of true sportsmanship. That was true over 100 years ago and is still true today. It is evident in their corporate philosophy which, simply stated, is "Contributing to society through the advancement of sporting goods and the promotion of sports."
Mizuno’s product development strategy is to create products with features that enhance athlete performance and are unique to only Mizuno. These technological advancements make their sporting equipment and apparel go the extra mile and keep their customers in tip top playing form no matter the sport or the conditions. Mizuno believes in making products that work in harmony with the body, helping its users to be the best athlete they can be.
  • Philosophy: Never Settle™ is more than just a tagline. It's Mizuno's calling. Mizuno's way of seeing the world. And the rallying cry for the entire company.
  • Innovation: Breakthroughs come by leadership and discovery, not by following others. Mizuno's R&D teams will stop at nothing to give athletes the gear they need to perform their best.
  • Leadership: Mizuno challenges themselves each day to innovate and constantly improve. And Mizuno's leaders not only are seasoned in their respective sports but also inspire the entire company to make the world a better place through participation in sports.

Monday, February 20, 2012

Undisciplined Discipline

After running the Marine Corps Marathon in late October, I had met my goal for the year and didn't have any short-term goals in mind.  I got my MCM Tatt that I promised myself as a reward and reminder, but lacked motivation to train. BTW,  I intend to add a little runner for each race over 26.2 miles.  Hopefully I will have an anklet by 50. I know this may be a bit self absorbed and silly at my age, but I don't really care.

After recovering from the marathon in a week, I started back on my 6 day a week 5 mile regimen, but also gained about 5-8 pounds in the process.  The primary reason for the weight gain is that I didn't have any incentive and I also didn't watch my diet as closely.  I read several articles that said this often happens after meeting your long-term goal.  After about two months into 2012,  I finally made a short-term goal of adding a 10 mile run to my weekly plan and have stuck to it.  I also added a long-term goal to enter and run (with a little luck from the lottery) the 2012 NYC Marathon and intend to change my training strategy. 
So I guess the moral of this piece is that goals do matter--they keep the undisciplined disciplined.
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